FIVE CONTEMPORARY YARNS USED IN HANDLOOMS


FIVE CONTEMPORARY YARNS USED IN HANDLOOMS

JUTE

This economical fibre used to make gunny bags has now found its way to the saree loom. Designers across the country have experimented with this fabric to weave some gorgeous prints and embroideries. It’s a good substitute for cotton, highly durable and makes a bold fashion statement as well.

BANANA FIBRE

This humble plantain has got a new exotic twist. Sheaths of fibre from banana stems are woven into yards of fabric used to make the nine-yard saree. This fibre has wiriness and natural sheen making it perfect for handlooms.

PINEAPPLE FIBRE

This tropical fruit has more to it than a juicy pulp. Pineapple leaves, usually thrown away as waste, are now being used to make eco-friendly fabrics. Strands of fibre are bleached thoroughly to before its woven, and typically a saree from this yarn takes about eight days to weave.

JAVA COTTON

Java Cotton is obtained from the kapok tree or its fruit. This fibre is one-eight the weight of regular cotton and inelastic in nature. However, weavers have been using this fibre to spin the yarn into handlooms, making a good substitute to regular cotton.

BAMBOO

If you thought cotton and linen are the only fabrics to keep you cool, think again. Bamboo has given cool a new look. Fibres from this grassy plant make for absolutely light and airy handlooms and easy to drape as a saree too. This coupled with the fact that it takes half the time to dry.

So why not rev up your saree collection with some contemporary yet environmentally friendly handlooms? It’s worth the money and memories.

Shonali Advani is a trained journalist, having worked previously with leading publications such as the Economic Times and the Entrepreneur magazine. She is now a freelance writer  with a keen interest in arts, culture, and heritage and brings this passion to her posts for The Registry of Sarees.